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Elliott Brown Transport
24 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum

Returning to the visit of the distant past from August 2011. This time we take a look at the Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum. A collection of vintage cars and motorbikes and other vehicles. It is Bradburn & Wedge Ltd, a car showroom displaying a collection of vintage vehicles, all manufactured around the Black Country. Such as Bean, Westfield, Sunbeam, Guy and AJS.

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Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum





Returning to the visit of the distant past from August 2011. This time we take a look at the Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum. A collection of vintage cars and motorbikes and other vehicles. It is Bradburn & Wedge Ltd, a car showroom displaying a collection of vintage vehicles, all manufactured around the Black Country. Such as Bean, Westfield, Sunbeam, Guy and AJS.


The Vehicle Display at the Black Country Living Museum

In the building that houses the Vehicle Display at the Black Country Living Museum, it holds their collection of Black Country manufactured cars and motorcycles. Also commercial vehicles. From Bean to Westfield. From Sunbeam to Diamond. From Guy to AJS.  It has the appearance of a 1950s garage. Based on the car showrooms of local company, Bradburn and Wedge. The company was founded in 1918, when William Howard Bradburn joined with Harry Wedge.

 

The photos in the gallery below, taken during a visit to the Black Country Living Museum in August 2011. While they are still closed on the third lockdown, enjoy this digital post.

 

Sunbeam motorcycle and Guy Fire Engine

On the left is a couple of motorcycles, including a Sunbeam. The one in the middle is a  1918 French Army Model. On the right is a Guy Fire Engine dating from 1924.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Brevitt's

Seen here is an old commercial van. This was General Carriers, J. Brevitt of Willenhall, Staffordshire (now West Midlands).

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Collection of vintage motorcycles made in the Black Country

Here we see a collection of old motorcycles. Mostly Sunbeam's. Some are A.J.S motorcycles. Most are T.T. Model's.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (13).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The motorcycle closest to the camera was numbered 13 in the collection.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (14).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Number 2 in the collection in the middle.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (15).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Another view of number 13, towards a car that looks like it dates to the 1990s, and the Brevitt's van.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (16).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

Collection of vintage motorcars made in the Black Country

 

1903 Sunbeam

Entering the museum, the first cars I see near the door. The yellow motor is a 1903 Sunbeam 10/12 HP. car.

In the middle is a 1912 Star Victoria. To the far left is the General Carriers - J. Brevitt van.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Close up look at the yellow Sunbeam made in 1903.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1912 Star Victoria

A close up look at the dark red Star Victoria motor made in 1912.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1923 Bean 14 Tourer

Next up is a Bean 14 Tourer. It was made by A. Harper, Sons & Bean in 1923.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1934 Sunbeam Dawn

The dark green car is a Sunbeam Dawn. Built in July 1934. It was sold to a Dr. Hilliard in September 1934 (who lived in Taunton). He owned it for 26 years. Since then it has resided in the West Midlands.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1930 A.J.S. Tourer

Next we have a 1930 A.J.S. Tourer (A.J.S. Coachbuilt 2-Seater). It was made by A.J. Stevens & Company Limited. The chassis was built by John Thompson Motor pressings at Bilston.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1931 Star Coupe

The following motor is a 1931 Star Coupe. Built by the Star Motor Company of Wolverhampton. The company was taken over by Guy Motors of Wolverhampton in 1928.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Old motors in a state of repair

Various old motors in a state of repair as they were back in the summer of 2011. Probably all date to the 1930s (or earlier).

 

There was no signs in the window at the time, and even with Google Lens, now in 2021, is a bit hard to tell what model this motor is. Plus the engine was missing at the time.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (10).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Possibly a 1931 Alvis in the photo below.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (11).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This motor might be a Buton. Cannot find any more details.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (12).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown Civic pride
22 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
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Busts, statues and portraits in the Birmingham Council House

Inside of the Birmingham Council House you can find several busts, statues and portraits that belong now to the Birmingham Museums Trust. Seen near the main staircase from the double doors, and portraits in the corridor outside of the Banqueting Suite. Seen during the Birmingham We Are events of November 2018 and January 2020.

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Busts, statues and portraits in the Birmingham Council House





Inside of the Birmingham Council House you can find several busts, statues and portraits that belong now to the Birmingham Museums Trust. Seen near the main staircase from the double doors, and portraits in the corridor outside of the Banqueting Suite. Seen during the Birmingham We Are events of November 2018 and January 2020.


There is many civic artworks to see in the Birmingham Council House. As you enter the giant double doors from Victoria Square, you will pass several busts. Head up the main staircase, and there is a pair of statues halfway up. Then on the corridor on the first floor landing, you will find several portraits of important people in Birmingham's history, as detailed below.


 

Busts in the Council House

There is three busts near the bottom of the main staircase from the entraJesse Collings nce from Victoria Square. Including Joseph Gillott, Jesse Collings and John Skirrow Wright.

Joseph Gillott

This is a marble bust of Joseph Gillott (1799 - 1873) by Peter Hollins (1800 - 1886).
Gillott was a Birmingham pen manufacturer and patron of the arts. He made pens at the Victoria Works on Graham Street and Frederick Street in the Jewellery Quarter. You can see an exhibition of his works at The Pen Museum at The Argent Centre on Frederick Street.

dndimg alt="Joseph Gillott" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joseph Gillott bust at the Council House.JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Jesse Collings

A marble bust of The Rt. Hon. Jesse Collings PC (1831 - 1920) by Albert Toft (1862 - 1949). Collings was a Liberal (later Liberal Unionist), and later served as Mayor of Birmingham, 1878-9, MP for Ipswich (1882 - 86) and Bordesley, Birmingham (1886 - 1918). There is also a portrait painted in 1885 in the Council House, by Jonahtan Pratt (1835 - 1911), but it is not it a public area to view.

dndimg alt="Jesse Collings" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bust CC (Nov 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

John Skirrow Wright

This is a bronze bust of John Skirrow Wright. It was cast by William Bloye, from a marble statue by Francis John Williamson. The original statue was made in 1883 and unveiled by John Bright MP in the Council House Square. The statue was joined by the statue of Joseph Priestley, and from 1901 that of Queen Victoria. In 1913, Priestley and Wright were moved to Chamberlain Place (now Chamberlain Square), so that Victoria could be joined by a statue of her son King Edward VII (by the sculptor Albert Toft). The statue remained in Chamberlain Place until 1951, when it was moved to storage (a new site was never found, the statue is now lost). However in 1956, a bronze copy of the bust was made by William Bloye, and was unveiled in the Council House in 1957, where it remains today.

dndimg alt="John Skirrow Wright" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bust CC (Nov 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

Heading up or down the main staircase in the Council House, you would see statues of a young looking Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

 

Queen Victoria

Victoria was born in 1819, and reigned from 1837 until her death in 1901. A marble statue by Thomas Brock was unveiled in Victoria Square (formerly Council House Square), 12 days before her death. It was later cast in bronze in 1951 by William Bloye. A new Sceptre was installed in 2011, to replace the old one that was lost.

In Birmingham, Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone for the Victoria Law Courts, during her Golden Jubilee year of 1887. There was a Queen's College on Paradise Street named in her honour, which gained this status by Royal Charter (it was the original Birmingham Medical School founded in 1828). Now just a façade built in 1904 (the rear building demolished and rebuilt now offices).

dndimg alt="Victoria and Albert" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/QV CC (Nov 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Prince Albert

Albert was born in 1819, and married Queen Victoria in 1840. He was Prince Consort until his untimely death in 1861.

In Birmingham, Prince Albert laid the foundation stone of the Birmingham & Midland Institute, on Paradise Street in 1855. It was moved from there in 1974 to Cornwall Street, where the Birmingham & Midland Institute is now based on Margaret Street. The old building was demolished to make way for Paradise Circus Queensway, Fletchers Walk and the Birmingham Conservatoire (which itself was later demolished in 2018). You can find a Grade II listed equestrian statue of Prince Albert in Queen Square, Wolverhampton, dated 1866 by Thomas Thorneycroft.

dndimg alt="Victoria and Albert" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/QV CC (Nov 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

Portraits in the Council House

There is five portraits to see in the corridor, just outside of the Banquetin Suite at the Council House. Including portraits of Peter Hollins, James Watt, Sir Josiah Mason, George Dawson and Joseph Chamberlain.

 

Peter Hollins

This is a portrait of Peter Hollins, Sculptor (1800 - 1886) by William Thomas Roden (1800 - 1886). Oil on canvas. He was an English sculptor who operated throughout the 19th Century. He was Vice-President of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists for 37 years. In Birmingham, he is known for sculpting the busts of Charles Lloyd (1831) for the Birmingham General Hospital, Felix Mendelssohn (1850) for Birmingham Town Hall and of William Congreve Russell (1853) exhibited at Birmingham Society of Arts. He also sculpted statues that used to be in Calthorpe Park of Robert Peel (1855) (now outside of Tally Ho!) and Thomas Attwood (1859) (currently in storage). Also a statue of Rowland Hill (1869) originally at the Birmingham Exchange, moved to the Birmingham GPO in 1874, and GPO HQ in 1891 (it was lost in storage during WW2).

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

James Watt

This is a portrait said to be of James Watt (1736 - 1819) by Sir William Beechley (1753 - 1839) attributed. A Scottish engineer who partnered with Matthew Boulton to improve the steam engine.  He lived at Watts House, 17 Regent Place in the Jewellery Quarter from 1777 to 1790. He moved to Heathfield Hall in Handsworth where he lived until his death in 1819. His statue by Alexander Munro (1868) was in Chamberlain Square until 2015. The Boulton, Watt & Murdoch statue by William Bloye (1956), gilded in 2006, was on Broad Street until 2017.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Sir Josiah Mason

This is a black and white photograph of Sir Josiah Mason (1795 - 1881). He was a Non-Conformist from a Kiddermister family. He established his first Almshouses in 1858 and an Orphanage in Erdington in 1868. He founded Mason Science College in 1880, which was in Chamberlain Place (later Chamberlain Square), next to the Birmingham Reference Library. This later became the University of Birmingham (which was founded in Edgbaston in 1900). He was knighted in 1872.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

George Dawson

This is a portrait of George Dawson (1821 - 1876). He was a preacher. He called for radical and social and politcal reform in Birmingham. In 1866 he gave a speech at the opening of the first Birmingham Central Library. His statue was in Chamberlain Square, which was sculpted in 1880 by Thomas Woolner. It is now in storage. At least one other statue was made of him at the time. There is also several busts, now at the Library of Birmingham and at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Joseph Chamberlain

This is a portrait of Joseph Chamberlain (1836 - 1914) by Sir Oswald Joseph Birley (1880 - 1952). Oil on canvas. The great statesman was the Mayor of Birmingham (1873 to 1876), a Birmingham MP (from 1876). He served as the Leader of the Opposition (1906-07), Secretary of State for the Colonies (1895 to 1903). The Chamberlain Memorial was unveiled in his lifetime in 1880 in Chamberlain Square. The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower was completed in 1908 at the University of Birmingham. There is also a Chamberlain Clock in the Jewellery Quarter from 1903 (removed for repairs in 2020, due to be returned fully restored soon). He lived at Highbury Hall on the Highbury Estate from 1880 until his death in 1914.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown History & heritage
16 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
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The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory

The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter is at 75-80 Vyse Street in the Jewellery Quarter (Hockley). It opened in 1992 in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory. When the factory closed for good in 1981, it left a time capsule, that the last owners would be unaware that it would be left for future generations to enjoy. Now part of the Birmingham Museums Trust.

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The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory





The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter is at 75-80 Vyse Street in the Jewellery Quarter (Hockley). It opened in 1992 in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory. When the factory closed for good in 1981, it left a time capsule, that the last owners would be unaware that it would be left for future generations to enjoy. Now part of the Birmingham Museums Trust.


Museum of the Jewellery Quarter

Not far from Jewellery Quarter Station is the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter on Vyse Street. I think one of my schools took me there once, in the mid 1990s, and I've not been inside since, but have walked past it many times over the years. It's at 75 to 80 Vyse Street. No 76 on the corner of Branston Street is now The Whisky Club, but was previously used as an Events Space.

 

History of the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter

The museum occupies the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufacturing firms premises which closed for good in 1981. They ceased trading, leaving the premises as a time capsule unaware that they would be leaving it for future generations. The museum opened here in 1992 and is a branch of the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery. Smith & Pepper was founded by Charles Smith and his uncle Edwin Pepper in 1899 and specialised in gold bracelets and other jewellery until it closed down in 1981. When the company closed, all the tools, machinery and papers were left behind. Also the former butterfly wing jewellery specialists T.L. Mott Ltd, along with all it's contents, was added to the museum when it opened in 1992.

It is a Grade II listed building (from 2004). No 75 Vyse Street was built in 1909 by George E. Pepper for F. Moore.No 77 Vyse Street was built in 1914, also by Pepper. No 79 Vyse Street was rebuilt in 1990. The building had alterations during the 20th Century. Built of red brick and ashlar stone dressings. No's 77 and 78 was the former Smith and Pepper Works. The museum to the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter is located in two late 19th Century manufactories. The Birmingham Museums Trust took over the running of the museum from Birmingham City Council in 2012.

 

December 2012

My first views of the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter on Vyse Street, surrounded by all the other jewellery manufacturing workshops on that side of the road. The buildings from 75 to 80 Vyse Street are now part of the museum.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2012) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This is the main entrance to the museum. There is a gift shop at the front (and probably the ticket office).

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2012) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Information Centre

There used to be an Information Centre at the end of Vyse Street near The Big Peg. It was demolished in 2014 to make way for The Golden Square. It was also seen near the end of 2012.

dndimg alt="Jewellery Quarter Information" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/JQ Information (Dec 2012) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

At the time, there was a sign here for The Jewellery Quarter Birmingham's Gem. Here it made reference to the Award winning Museum of the Jewellery Quarter. As well as The Pen Museum, Historic Buildings and Pavement Trails. Plus St Paul's Square, (Birmingham's last remaining Georgian Square). And the Historic Cemeteries of Key Hill and Warstone Lane.

dndimg alt="Jewellery Quarter Information" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/JQ Information (Dec 2012) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

January 2013

A few days later, on New Years Day 2013, another walk past the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter on Vyse Street. The green painted doors at 76 Vyse Street. By 2015, this was used as Event Space at the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter. By 2019 it was The Whisky Club.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There is this green letter box, marked as H. Aston Ltd. It is at 76 Vyse Street, what is now The Whisky Club. It is at the corner of Vyse Street with Branston Street.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/JQ letterbox Vyse St (Jan 2013).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There is a plaque at the entrance to the museum, part of the Jewellery Quarter Discovery Trail. It was sponsored by the Birmingham City Action Team. It mentions Smith & Pepper jewellery works at this site. Plus the former premises of butterfly wing jewellery specialists T.L. Mott Ltd. Both of which were turned into the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This sign with the opening times, Tuesday to Saturday, 10:30am to 4pm. Close on Sunday's and Monday's except for Bank Holiday Monday's. Wheelchair access available on Branston Street.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The museum received an Enjoy England Awards for Excellence 2010. And were a Gold Winner. Congratulations for winning it 11 years ago!

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

December 2019

My most recent photos taken a couple of years ago on Vyse Street. Saw the sign for the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter, next to a Christmas light of an anchor. Which is the symbol used by the Assay Office.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The main entrance door to the museum. Dogs on a lead were now allowed to enter the museum with their owners.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Took the plaque again, that I previously took years earlier (sometimes I forget what I've taken previously). Except I got it much closer up here, so you can read it.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

During the lockdowns the museum is temporarily closed. Hopefully they will be allowed to reopen later in the spring and summer of 2021.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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01 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
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Newman Brothers Coffin Works

Did you know that when Newman Brothers Coffin Furniture Factory closed down for good in 1998, they left all the tools and equipment as it was. The building now called the Coffin Works was opened as a museum in 2014 after a period of restoration work under taken by the Birmingham Conservation Trust. In the years since it opened, I've yet to pay a visit to go inside. Fleet Street in JQ.

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Newman Brothers Coffin Works





Did you know that when Newman Brothers Coffin Furniture Factory closed down for good in 1998, they left all the tools and equipment as it was. The building now called the Coffin Works was opened as a museum in 2014 after a period of restoration work under taken by the Birmingham Conservation Trust. In the years since it opened, I've yet to pay a visit to go inside. Fleet Street in JQ.


The Coffin Works

Located on Fleet Street in the Jewellery Quarter is this hiden gem. The Coffin Works is at 13-15 Fleet Street. Between Summer Row (at Parade) and Hotel ibis Styles (which is between Fleet Street and Lionel Street). Also near the head office of Mitchells & Butlers.

The Newman Brothers Coffin Furniture Factory is a part of the Jewellery Quarter conservation area. Founded by the brothers Alfred and Edwin Newman. They moved to this site in 1894 (the building was built from 1892 to 1894 and designed by Roger Harley in 1892). Their company began life as a brass foundry company, before they changed to making coffin furniture (the handles, nameplates etc, all which would get buried with the deceased in the coffin underground).

Edwin ceased to be involved in the company during 1895, leaving his brother Alfred as the sole trader of the business until his death in 1933. He was succeeded by his two sons George and Horace. They ran the company until George Newman passed away in 1944, and his brother Horace Newman passed away in 1952. After that there was a variety of owners of the company. Although their sister Nina continued to hold shares until 1980.

The business passed to the Doggart and Whittington families. The last owner was Joyce Green, who acquired the company following the death of the companies two managing directors in 1976. Green first joined the company as a secretary in 1949. She moved up through the ranks until she bought the company in 1989, and was the sole trader until the business closed for good in 1998.

 

Restoration

During the 1990s, Joyce Green fought for the building to be restored. The factory received a Grade II* listed status in the year 2000 by English Heritage. In 2001 the Birmingham Conservation Trust carried out a study on the building about the threat of redevelopment and the loss of the building. The factory was one of three candidates in the first series of the BBC's Restoration programme in 2003, although it didn't receive enough votes to reach the final.

But it got enough interest for restoration in the future. In 2006 / 2007 the Birmingham Conservation Trust got a grant of £1.5 million. The credit crunch in 2009 caused a minor setback when Advantage West Midlands collapsed. But Birmingham City Council was able to buy the building from AWM in 2010. Restoration finally took place during 2013 to 2014. The museum opened in October 2014. Joyce Green was involved in the project throughout until her death in 2009.

 

Fleet Street, 2014

In June 2014, I was walking up Fleet Street, when I took my first photo of the building. Viet Moon was a restaurant at 5-11 Fleet Street. While the Coffin Works next door was coming to it's conclusion in terms of it's restoration.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Jun 2014).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By September 2014, the Coffin Works restoration project was complete. Heading down some steps between Lionel Street and Fleet Street in the Jewellery Quarter, saw these painted signs on the wall to the left "to the Coffin Works Visit Newman Bros.".

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Sep 2014) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The side of the Coffin Works with at least three chimneys.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Sep 2014) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There was another painted sign further down the steps closer to Fleet Street.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Sep 2014) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Now a first proper look at Newman Brothers aka The Coffin Works. It would open as a museum in the following month.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Sep 2014) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

A zoom in to the painted Newman Brothers sign looking as good as new!

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Sep 2014) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This view below from the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. This view towards Fleet Street from near the Cable-Stay Footbridge and Farmers Bridge Lock No 6. Behind me was the Newhall Square development.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works BF Canal (Sep 2014).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Fleet Street, 2018

By April 2018, I saw this plaque on the Coffin Works. From The Birmingham Civic Society, who presented the Renaiisance Award to the Birmingham Conservation Trust for the Newman Brothers Coffin Works in 2014.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Apr 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A full look at the building with the plaque. In all the years since it opened as a museum, I never once thought of buying tickets in advance to pop in and take photos.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Apr 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Fleet Street, 2020

This was on the evening in December 2020, when I was walking towards Jewellery Quarter Station, to see the Christmas lights at St Paul's Square and The Golden Square, as well as surrounding streets. After passing the Library of Birmingham, via Parade, got onto Fleet Street, and saw the Newman Brothers sign lit up after dark! Bit hard to see in this photo.

dndimg alt="Coffin Works" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Coffin Works (Dec 2020).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Maybe once museums can open again, I may think of buying a ticket on their website and pay them a visit. But this will be when I can travel on buses and trains again. After lockdown restrictions get eased again (hopefully for good this time).

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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A visit to Dudmaston Estate during October 2020

The last National Trust property visit of 2020 was to Dudmaston Estate in October 2020. It's in Shropshire. A 17th Century country house (not open apart from a gallery inside). Near the village of Quatt. As before booked the tickets online for a slot. The grounds you could walk about and explore. Tea Room was open, but you had to have your tea or coffee at picnic tables outside.

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A visit to Dudmaston Estate during October 2020





The last National Trust property visit of 2020 was to Dudmaston Estate in October 2020. It's in Shropshire. A 17th Century country house (not open apart from a gallery inside). Near the village of Quatt. As before booked the tickets online for a slot. The grounds you could walk about and explore. Tea Room was open, but you had to have your tea or coffee at picnic tables outside.


Dudmaston

The National Trust property of Dudmaston is located near the village of Quatt in Shropshire. The country house dates to the 17th century. There is former farm buildings, some of which have been converted into a tea room and second hand book shop. There was a gallery you could visit (sanitise your hands before going in), but no photography allowed inside for copyright reasons (I think the family still live in the house). Tickets and time slot as before booked via the National Trust website (with tickets on EventBrite). If there was a gift shop, I think it was closed.

This visit was on the 18th October 2020 (so was about half a month before the second lockdown began).

 

Outbuildings at Dudmaston

The Outbuildings from the lawn. Near here was picnic tables. A queue for the toilets, sanitise your hands, wer your mask if you go in.

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A courtyard near the Outbuildings. All the rooms here were closed. There was a one way system in place, so if you wanted, you could enter the gardens from this gate on the right.

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The Outbuildings from the garden. Due to the one way system in place, if you went out of the garden, then back in, you had to head this way to get out.

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This gate to the courtyard looked nice, but it was no entry this way (you could only walk through them from the other direction).

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Private garden seen over the fence from the Kitchen Garden. Far end of the Outbuildings.

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Dudmaston Hall

Round the back of Dudmaston Hall. A tent with National Trust volunteer, to register you before going into the exhibition / gallery. Sanitise your hands again, mask on. No photos allowed inside (tempting as it was).

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The back of Dudmaston Hall. It is a Grade II* listed building. A Queen Anne mansion. Built of red brick with stone dressings. Was also a 19th Century office and stable wing built in the Elizabethan style. Couldn't cross the rope on the left.

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Heading down the hill, a look at Dudmaston Hall, an impresive looking house.

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There was this Red Ivy going down the house. A bit like those poppy art installations around Remembrance time. Some old steps with urns.

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Another view of the house with the Red Ivy in the middle.

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The Red Ivy looked wonderful from any angle in the parkland.

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You could have a walk around the Dingle Walk. Eventually you would end up at the back of the Big Pool, with this wonderful picturesque view of Dudmaston Hall.

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Parkland and gardens

A look down to the Big Pool at Dudmaston Estate.

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Sculpture in the garden, part of a trail. Spaceframe sculpted by Anthony Twentyman during 1985.

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Seated bench area for relaxing and looking at the views of the picturesque parkland.

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Greylag geese flying and landing in the Big Pool.

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The Kitchen Garden. Pumpkins in the greenhouse before Halloween.

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Fingerpost on the Dingle Walk. Head right to the Garden, or left to the Dingle Walk.

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Kept spotting this brick boathouse near the Big Pool, although didn't see any boats in the lake.

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The South Lodge seen from the car as we left Dudmaston Estate. Now a private house. A Grade II listed building dating to the early 19th Century. Made of coursed sandstone rubble, with a tiled roof. The gate on exiting the estate was an automatic electric gate.

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Hope to visit more National Trust properties in 2021, after the 3rd lockdown ends, if we are allowed to travel far again. Especially in the Spring or Summer months.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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