Posts
232
Points
14K
Go Popular Tags

Posts

Let our community keep you entertained with regular articles that they would like to share with you.

Search our posts by passion or by type of post to find what you are looking for.

Elliott Brown Civic pride
06 Apr 2021 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

Return of the Chamberlain Clock to the Jewellery Quarter

Over the weekend of the 20th and 21st March 2021, the Chamberlain Clock was reinstalled at the island at Vyse Street, Warstone Lane and Frederick Street in the Jewellery Quarter. Once restrictions were changed to "Stay Local", I got the train up to the JQ, to start a walk around the City Centre. First target was the newly restored clock. Smith of Derby have done an amazing job.

View feature View community

Return of the Chamberlain Clock to the Jewellery Quarter





Over the weekend of the 20th and 21st March 2021, the Chamberlain Clock was reinstalled at the island at Vyse Street, Warstone Lane and Frederick Street in the Jewellery Quarter. Once restrictions were changed to "Stay Local", I got the train up to the JQ, to start a walk around the City Centre. First target was the newly restored clock. Smith of Derby have done an amazing job.


The Jewellery Quarter Chamberlain Clock via the JQ BID.

 

Previous Chamberlain Clock posts here:

 

It was probably best that I was unable to travel up to the Jewellery Quarter over the weekend of the 20th and 21st March 2021. As at the time we were still under "Stay at Home" restrictions. This changed on Monday 29th March 2021 to "Stay Local". Working at home, I was unable to travel up to the Jewellery Quarter until the Easter Bank Holiday Weekend. So got the train to Jewellery Quarter Station on Saturday 3rd April 2021 in the morning. For the start of a walk around the City Centre (which would end at Selfridges and Birmingham Moor Street Station).

 

A new sign about The Chamberlain Memorial Clock was installed close to The Golden Square and Vyse Street (just behind the Rose Villa Tavern). It's mentions Joseph Chamberlain's roll in what is now called The South Africa War (formerly The Second Boer War of 1899 -- 1902). Chamberlain's tour of South Africa led to this clock being erected near here in 1903. QR code on the sign, leads to the Chamberlain Clock website (link at the top of this article).

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

First view of the newly restored Chamberlain Clock from Vyse Street, on the walk from Jewellery Quarter Station. The other clock to the far right is at Three Brindleyplace. Jurys Inn was also visible from here.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

It was now possible from Vyse Street to see the restored Chamberlain Clock with The Mercian and The Bank Tower 2. As well as the clocktower of Three Brindleyplace behind it. The Bank Tower 1 and Eleven Brindleyplace visible to the right.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Mercian 03042021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

View of the Chamberlain Clock, now working from Vyse Street, with Warstone Lane to the left and right. Frederick Street is straight ahead.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The clock was previously restored during 1989 - 90 by Octo Welding. This time from 2020 - 21 by Smith of Derby. Greggs at the Chamberlain Building to the left.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

As well as repairing the internal mechanisms, Smith of Derby also repainted the clock and the plaques from 1903 and 1990. This view to the HSBC UK bank.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A close up zoom in of the clock. It looks amazing now. Lets hope it lasts more than 30 years before they have to restore it again.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Now looking from Frederick Street, with the Chamberlain Clock. Vyse Street is behind. Not far away is Warstone Lane Cemetery.

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Heading down Frederick Street towards Newhall Hill, one more view of the clock. Since this lockdown began, Costa Coffee opened up a new coffee shop at 32 Frederick Street. Somewhere to stop for coffee in the future (when we can sit inside again, and not just have a takeaway).

dndimg alt="Chamberlain Clock" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CCJQ 03042021 (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
70 passion points
Elliott Brown Environment & green action
30 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog, named in honour of the late Joy Fifer MBE

On my one weekend walk during this third lockdown, I walked towards Moseley Bog, via Swanshurst Lane in Moseley. I got into Joy's Wood at the gate on Yardley Wood Road. It is a nature reserve that was formerly a tip. Named after local environmentalist Joy Fifer MBE, who campaigned between 1980 and 2002, to preseve the wood from building development. Sadly she died in 2003 aged 64.

View feature View community

Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog, named in honour of the late Joy Fifer MBE





On my one weekend walk during this third lockdown, I walked towards Moseley Bog, via Swanshurst Lane in Moseley. I got into Joy's Wood at the gate on Yardley Wood Road. It is a nature reserve that was formerly a tip. Named after local environmentalist Joy Fifer MBE, who campaigned between 1980 and 2002, to preseve the wood from building development. Sadly she died in 2003 aged 64.


Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog

There is a couple of gated entrances for pedestrians from Yardley Wood Road in Moseley. This leads to Joy's Wood, which in turn leads onto Moseley Bog.

 

The Wood named after the late Joy Fifer MBE

The wood is now a nature reserve and was named after the late local environmentalist campaigner Joy Fifer MBE (which she received at the end of the year 2000 in the New Year's Honours List, then aged 61). Until the 1980s the land was a tip (or landfill).

Joy first became involved in Moseley Bog around 1980, when she heard that planning consent had been given for building on the land at the time. She and other volunteers were concerned about the wildlife here that might be affected. With them she co-founded the Moseley Bog Management Trust. Their first goal was to convince the council to buy the land on which the Bog was situated, and making sure that nothing was built on the site. After six years the goal was reached. She first got diagnosed with her illness in 1985. But continued to campaign until 2002.

One project involved preserving a bronze-age site which had been found in the rural woodland. Also the link to J. R. R. Tolkien as a child when he lived nearby on Wake Green Road. In the early 2000s they hoped to set up a Tolkien Centre (I don't think that happened, possibly due to the Tolkien Estate rights holders refusing permission). Sadly Joy died of her illness around 2003 (aged 63 or 64).

You can find an archived interview with Joy Fifer here: Your Honour: It's in her nature to keep campaigning; Joy Fifer MBE talks to Peter Rasmussen

 

As of 2021, there is a small bit of land near Moseley Bog being built on at Wake Green Road. This will be Extra Care flats. From Michael Blanning Housing Trust Association. The site has been behind hoardings for about 10 years (since the previous properties on that site were demolished). It would have been ideal to create a new entrance here to Moseley Bog, and a Visitor Centre, than yet another retirement village. A sign for the Wake Green Centre (from Birmingham City Council) is still visible from the roadside. At least one of the former properties looked like a Victorian townhouse, they were all demolished in 2015 (by the looks of Google Maps Street View).

 

Entering Joy's Wood from Yardley Wood Road

Back to my visit to Moseley Bog on Sunday 28th March 2021. I walked up Swanshurst Lane, with the aim of getting in the main entrance of Moseley Bog on Yardley Wood Road. But then saw this gate and entered Joy's Wood at this point.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Leaves have mostly not yet grown back on the trees, there is a dirt path leading into the wood.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Some daffodils line the dirt path alongside the trees.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Paths in two directions, I took the one leading close to the main Yardley Wood Road entrance of Moseley Bog.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

It was a little bit muddy down here, but wasn't slippy. Daffodils on the left.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Some of the daffodils seen growing to the left of the path.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There is a large open field here, following the dirt track towards Moseley Bog.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The path leads to the main entrance of Moseley Bog at Yardley Wood Road.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There is now a plaque erected in Autumn 2014 about Joy's Wood and the late Joy Fifer MBE. It was funded and erected by the Moseley Society, The Friends of Moseley Bog and Joy's Wood and the Saint Agnes (Moseley) Residents Association.

dndimg alt="Joy's Wood at Moseley Bog" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joys Wood Moseley Bog (Mar 2021) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
80 passion points
Elliott Brown Transport
24 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum

Returning to the visit of the distant past from August 2011. This time we take a look at the Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum. A collection of vintage cars and motorbikes and other vehicles. It is Bradburn & Wedge Ltd, a car showroom displaying a collection of vintage vehicles, all manufactured around the Black Country. Such as Bean, Westfield, Sunbeam, Guy and AJS.

View feature View community

Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum





Returning to the visit of the distant past from August 2011. This time we take a look at the Motor Museum at the Black Country Living Museum. A collection of vintage cars and motorbikes and other vehicles. It is Bradburn & Wedge Ltd, a car showroom displaying a collection of vintage vehicles, all manufactured around the Black Country. Such as Bean, Westfield, Sunbeam, Guy and AJS.


The Vehicle Display at the Black Country Living Museum

In the building that houses the Vehicle Display at the Black Country Living Museum, it holds their collection of Black Country manufactured cars and motorcycles. Also commercial vehicles. From Bean to Westfield. From Sunbeam to Diamond. From Guy to AJS.  It has the appearance of a 1950s garage. Based on the car showrooms of local company, Bradburn and Wedge. The company was founded in 1918, when William Howard Bradburn joined with Harry Wedge.

 

The photos in the gallery below, taken during a visit to the Black Country Living Museum in August 2011. While they are still closed on the third lockdown, enjoy this digital post.

 

Sunbeam motorcycle and Guy Fire Engine

On the left is a couple of motorcycles, including a Sunbeam. The one in the middle is a  1918 French Army Model. On the right is a Guy Fire Engine dating from 1924.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Brevitt's

Seen here is an old commercial van. This was General Carriers, J. Brevitt of Willenhall, Staffordshire (now West Midlands).

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Collection of vintage motorcycles made in the Black Country

Here we see a collection of old motorcycles. Mostly Sunbeam's. Some are A.J.S motorcycles. Most are T.T. Model's.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (13).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The motorcycle closest to the camera was numbered 13 in the collection.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (14).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Number 2 in the collection in the middle.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (15).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Another view of number 13, towards a car that looks like it dates to the 1990s, and the Brevitt's van.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (16).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

Collection of vintage motorcars made in the Black Country

 

1903 Sunbeam

Entering the museum, the first cars I see near the door. The yellow motor is a 1903 Sunbeam 10/12 HP. car.

In the middle is a 1912 Star Victoria. To the far left is the General Carriers - J. Brevitt van.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Close up look at the yellow Sunbeam made in 1903.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1912 Star Victoria

A close up look at the dark red Star Victoria motor made in 1912.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1923 Bean 14 Tourer

Next up is a Bean 14 Tourer. It was made by A. Harper, Sons & Bean in 1923.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1934 Sunbeam Dawn

The dark green car is a Sunbeam Dawn. Built in July 1934. It was sold to a Dr. Hilliard in September 1934 (who lived in Taunton). He owned it for 26 years. Since then it has resided in the West Midlands.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1930 A.J.S. Tourer

Next we have a 1930 A.J.S. Tourer (A.J.S. Coachbuilt 2-Seater). It was made by A.J. Stevens & Company Limited. The chassis was built by John Thompson Motor pressings at Bilston.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

1931 Star Coupe

The following motor is a 1931 Star Coupe. Built by the Star Motor Company of Wolverhampton. The company was taken over by Guy Motors of Wolverhampton in 1928.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Old motors in a state of repair

Various old motors in a state of repair as they were back in the summer of 2011. Probably all date to the 1930s (or earlier).

 

There was no signs in the window at the time, and even with Google Lens, now in 2021, is a bit hard to tell what model this motor is. Plus the engine was missing at the time.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (10).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Possibly a 1931 Alvis in the photo below.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (11).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This motor might be a Buton. Cannot find any more details.

dndimg alt="Black Country Living Museum" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BCLM MM (Aug 2011) (12).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
60 passion points
Elliott Brown Civic pride
22 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Busts, statues and portraits in the Birmingham Council House

Inside of the Birmingham Council House you can find several busts, statues and portraits that belong now to the Birmingham Museums Trust. Seen near the main staircase from the double doors, and portraits in the corridor outside of the Banqueting Suite. Seen during the Birmingham We Are events of November 2018 and January 2020.

View feature View community

Busts, statues and portraits in the Birmingham Council House





Inside of the Birmingham Council House you can find several busts, statues and portraits that belong now to the Birmingham Museums Trust. Seen near the main staircase from the double doors, and portraits in the corridor outside of the Banqueting Suite. Seen during the Birmingham We Are events of November 2018 and January 2020.


There is many civic artworks to see in the Birmingham Council House. As you enter the giant double doors from Victoria Square, you will pass several busts. Head up the main staircase, and there is a pair of statues halfway up. Then on the corridor on the first floor landing, you will find several portraits of important people in Birmingham's history, as detailed below.


 

Busts in the Council House

There is three busts near the bottom of the main staircase from the entraJesse Collings nce from Victoria Square. Including Joseph Gillott, Jesse Collings and John Skirrow Wright.

Joseph Gillott

This is a marble bust of Joseph Gillott (1799 - 1873) by Peter Hollins (1800 - 1886).
Gillott was a Birmingham pen manufacturer and patron of the arts. He made pens at the Victoria Works on Graham Street and Frederick Street in the Jewellery Quarter. You can see an exhibition of his works at The Pen Museum at The Argent Centre on Frederick Street.

dndimg alt="Joseph Gillott" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Joseph Gillott bust at the Council House.JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Jesse Collings

A marble bust of The Rt. Hon. Jesse Collings PC (1831 - 1920) by Albert Toft (1862 - 1949). Collings was a Liberal (later Liberal Unionist), and later served as Mayor of Birmingham, 1878-9, MP for Ipswich (1882 - 86) and Bordesley, Birmingham (1886 - 1918). There is also a portrait painted in 1885 in the Council House, by Jonahtan Pratt (1835 - 1911), but it is not it a public area to view.

dndimg alt="Jesse Collings" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bust CC (Nov 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

John Skirrow Wright

This is a bronze bust of John Skirrow Wright. It was cast by William Bloye, from a marble statue by Francis John Williamson. The original statue was made in 1883 and unveiled by John Bright MP in the Council House Square. The statue was joined by the statue of Joseph Priestley, and from 1901 that of Queen Victoria. In 1913, Priestley and Wright were moved to Chamberlain Place (now Chamberlain Square), so that Victoria could be joined by a statue of her son King Edward VII (by the sculptor Albert Toft). The statue remained in Chamberlain Place until 1951, when it was moved to storage (a new site was never found, the statue is now lost). However in 1956, a bronze copy of the bust was made by William Bloye, and was unveiled in the Council House in 1957, where it remains today.

dndimg alt="John Skirrow Wright" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bust CC (Nov 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

Heading up or down the main staircase in the Council House, you would see statues of a young looking Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

 

Queen Victoria

Victoria was born in 1819, and reigned from 1837 until her death in 1901. A marble statue by Thomas Brock was unveiled in Victoria Square (formerly Council House Square), 12 days before her death. It was later cast in bronze in 1951 by William Bloye. A new Sceptre was installed in 2011, to replace the old one that was lost.

In Birmingham, Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone for the Victoria Law Courts, during her Golden Jubilee year of 1887. There was a Queen's College on Paradise Street named in her honour, which gained this status by Royal Charter (it was the original Birmingham Medical School founded in 1828). Now just a façade built in 1904 (the rear building demolished and rebuilt now offices).

dndimg alt="Victoria and Albert" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/QV CC (Nov 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Prince Albert

Albert was born in 1819, and married Queen Victoria in 1840. He was Prince Consort until his untimely death in 1861.

In Birmingham, Prince Albert laid the foundation stone of the Birmingham & Midland Institute, on Paradise Street in 1855. It was moved from there in 1974 to Cornwall Street, where the Birmingham & Midland Institute is now based on Margaret Street. The old building was demolished to make way for Paradise Circus Queensway, Fletchers Walk and the Birmingham Conservatoire (which itself was later demolished in 2018). You can find a Grade II listed equestrian statue of Prince Albert in Queen Square, Wolverhampton, dated 1866 by Thomas Thorneycroft.

dndimg alt="Victoria and Albert" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/QV CC (Nov 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

Portraits in the Council House

There is five portraits to see in the corridor, just outside of the Banquetin Suite at the Council House. Including portraits of Peter Hollins, James Watt, Sir Josiah Mason, George Dawson and Joseph Chamberlain.

 

Peter Hollins

This is a portrait of Peter Hollins, Sculptor (1800 - 1886) by William Thomas Roden (1800 - 1886). Oil on canvas. He was an English sculptor who operated throughout the 19th Century. He was Vice-President of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists for 37 years. In Birmingham, he is known for sculpting the busts of Charles Lloyd (1831) for the Birmingham General Hospital, Felix Mendelssohn (1850) for Birmingham Town Hall and of William Congreve Russell (1853) exhibited at Birmingham Society of Arts. He also sculpted statues that used to be in Calthorpe Park of Robert Peel (1855) (now outside of Tally Ho!) and Thomas Attwood (1859) (currently in storage). Also a statue of Rowland Hill (1869) originally at the Birmingham Exchange, moved to the Birmingham GPO in 1874, and GPO HQ in 1891 (it was lost in storage during WW2).

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

James Watt

This is a portrait said to be of James Watt (1736 - 1819) by Sir William Beechley (1753 - 1839) attributed. A Scottish engineer who partnered with Matthew Boulton to improve the steam engine.  He lived at Watts House, 17 Regent Place in the Jewellery Quarter from 1777 to 1790. He moved to Heathfield Hall in Handsworth where he lived until his death in 1819. His statue by Alexander Munro (1868) was in Chamberlain Square until 2015. The Boulton, Watt & Murdoch statue by William Bloye (1956), gilded in 2006, was on Broad Street until 2017.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Sir Josiah Mason

This is a black and white photograph of Sir Josiah Mason (1795 - 1881). He was a Non-Conformist from a Kiddermister family. He established his first Almshouses in 1858 and an Orphanage in Erdington in 1868. He founded Mason Science College in 1880, which was in Chamberlain Place (later Chamberlain Square), next to the Birmingham Reference Library. This later became the University of Birmingham (which was founded in Edgbaston in 1900). He was knighted in 1872.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

George Dawson

This is a portrait of George Dawson (1821 - 1876). He was a preacher. He called for radical and social and politcal reform in Birmingham. In 1866 he gave a speech at the opening of the first Birmingham Central Library. His statue was in Chamberlain Square, which was sculpted in 1880 by Thomas Woolner. It is now in storage. At least one other statue was made of him at the time. There is also several busts, now at the Library of Birmingham and at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Joseph Chamberlain

This is a portrait of Joseph Chamberlain (1836 - 1914) by Sir Oswald Joseph Birley (1880 - 1952). Oil on canvas. The great statesman was the Mayor of Birmingham (1873 to 1876), a Birmingham MP (from 1876). He served as the Leader of the Opposition (1906-07), Secretary of State for the Colonies (1895 to 1903). The Chamberlain Memorial was unveiled in his lifetime in 1880 in Chamberlain Square. The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower was completed in 1908 at the University of Birmingham. There is also a Chamberlain Clock in the Jewellery Quarter from 1903 (removed for repairs in 2020, due to be returned fully restored soon). He lived at Highbury Hall on the Highbury Estate from 1880 until his death in 1914.

dndimg alt="Council House portrait" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Prt CC (Jan 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
70 passion points
Elliott Brown History & heritage
16 Mar 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory

The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter is at 75-80 Vyse Street in the Jewellery Quarter (Hockley). It opened in 1992 in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory. When the factory closed for good in 1981, it left a time capsule, that the last owners would be unaware that it would be left for future generations to enjoy. Now part of the Birmingham Museums Trust.

View feature View community

The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory





The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter is at 75-80 Vyse Street in the Jewellery Quarter (Hockley). It opened in 1992 in the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufactory. When the factory closed for good in 1981, it left a time capsule, that the last owners would be unaware that it would be left for future generations to enjoy. Now part of the Birmingham Museums Trust.


Museum of the Jewellery Quarter

Not far from Jewellery Quarter Station is the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter on Vyse Street. I think one of my schools took me there once, in the mid 1990s, and I've not been inside since, but have walked past it many times over the years. It's at 75 to 80 Vyse Street. No 76 on the corner of Branston Street is now The Whisky Club, but was previously used as an Events Space.

 

History of the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter

The museum occupies the former Smith & Pepper jewellery manufacturing firms premises which closed for good in 1981. They ceased trading, leaving the premises as a time capsule unaware that they would be leaving it for future generations. The museum opened here in 1992 and is a branch of the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery. Smith & Pepper was founded by Charles Smith and his uncle Edwin Pepper in 1899 and specialised in gold bracelets and other jewellery until it closed down in 1981. When the company closed, all the tools, machinery and papers were left behind. Also the former butterfly wing jewellery specialists T.L. Mott Ltd, along with all it's contents, was added to the museum when it opened in 1992.

It is a Grade II listed building (from 2004). No 75 Vyse Street was built in 1909 by George E. Pepper for F. Moore.No 77 Vyse Street was built in 1914, also by Pepper. No 79 Vyse Street was rebuilt in 1990. The building had alterations during the 20th Century. Built of red brick and ashlar stone dressings. No's 77 and 78 was the former Smith and Pepper Works. The museum to the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter is located in two late 19th Century manufactories. The Birmingham Museums Trust took over the running of the museum from Birmingham City Council in 2012.

 

December 2012

My first views of the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter on Vyse Street, surrounded by all the other jewellery manufacturing workshops on that side of the road. The buildings from 75 to 80 Vyse Street are now part of the museum.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2012) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This is the main entrance to the museum. There is a gift shop at the front (and probably the ticket office).

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2012) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Information Centre

There used to be an Information Centre at the end of Vyse Street near The Big Peg. It was demolished in 2014 to make way for The Golden Square. It was also seen near the end of 2012.

dndimg alt="Jewellery Quarter Information" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/JQ Information (Dec 2012) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

At the time, there was a sign here for The Jewellery Quarter Birmingham's Gem. Here it made reference to the Award winning Museum of the Jewellery Quarter. As well as The Pen Museum, Historic Buildings and Pavement Trails. Plus St Paul's Square, (Birmingham's last remaining Georgian Square). And the Historic Cemeteries of Key Hill and Warstone Lane.

dndimg alt="Jewellery Quarter Information" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/JQ Information (Dec 2012) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

January 2013

A few days later, on New Years Day 2013, another walk past the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter on Vyse Street. The green painted doors at 76 Vyse Street. By 2015, this was used as Event Space at the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter. By 2019 it was The Whisky Club.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There is this green letter box, marked as H. Aston Ltd. It is at 76 Vyse Street, what is now The Whisky Club. It is at the corner of Vyse Street with Branston Street.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/JQ letterbox Vyse St (Jan 2013).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There is a plaque at the entrance to the museum, part of the Jewellery Quarter Discovery Trail. It was sponsored by the Birmingham City Action Team. It mentions Smith & Pepper jewellery works at this site. Plus the former premises of butterfly wing jewellery specialists T.L. Mott Ltd. Both of which were turned into the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This sign with the opening times, Tuesday to Saturday, 10:30am to 4pm. Close on Sunday's and Monday's except for Bank Holiday Monday's. Wheelchair access available on Branston Street.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The museum received an Enjoy England Awards for Excellence 2010. And were a Gold Winner. Congratulations for winning it 11 years ago!

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Jan 2013) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

December 2019

My most recent photos taken a couple of years ago on Vyse Street. Saw the sign for the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter, next to a Christmas light of an anchor. Which is the symbol used by the Assay Office.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The main entrance door to the museum. Dogs on a lead were now allowed to enter the museum with their owners.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Took the plaque again, that I previously took years earlier (sometimes I forget what I've taken previously). Except I got it much closer up here, so you can read it.

dndimg alt="Museum of the Jewellery Quarter" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Museum JQ (Dec 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

During the lockdowns the museum is temporarily closed. Hopefully they will be allowed to reopen later in the spring and summer of 2021.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
80 passion points
Show more