Go Popular Tags

Posts

Let our community keep you entertained with regular articles that they would like to share with you.

Search our posts by passion or by type of post to find what you are looking for.

Elliott Brown Sport & leisure
17 Aug 2021 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Model Boating at Bournville Lake at The Valley Parkway

On regular Sunday's the Bournville Radio Sailing and Model Boat Club meet to use their remote controlled boats on Bournville Lake at The Valley Parkway, near Bournville Lane. The club has a history going back to 1900, although has been on this site since 1926. On Sunday morning, 15th August 2021, the club was back. Also some archive photos from 2017 and 2018.

View feature View community

Model Boating at Bournville Lake at The Valley Parkway





On regular Sunday's the Bournville Radio Sailing and Model Boat Club meet to use their remote controlled boats on Bournville Lake at The Valley Parkway, near Bournville Lane. The club has a history going back to 1900, although has been on this site since 1926. On Sunday morning, 15th August 2021, the club was back. Also some archive photos from 2017 and 2018.


Bournville Radio Sailing and Model Boat Club

The Bournville Radio Sailing and Model Boat Club, also called Bournville Model Yacht & Powerboat Club, was founded in the year 1900 as the Bournville Model Yachting Club at Rowheath Park. By 1926, George Cadbury Jr (son of the late George Cadbury who died in 1922) commissioned an area of marshland on the now famous Bournville Village Trust, to be reclaimed, and a concrete pool of even depth was created. The surrounding park is called The Valley Parkway by Birmingham City Council. The club has their own Boat House on site, and regularly meet on Sunday mornings for model yachting, and Sunday afternoons for model power boating. They sometimes also meet on other days for model boating.

 

26th March 2017

That Sunday there was model RNLI  powerboats on Bournville Lake at The Valley Parkway.

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Valley Pway Bville (Mar 2017) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Valley Pway Bville (Mar 2017) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

4th October 2018

On a Thursday morning walk through The Valley Parkway, I only managed to get one photo of a model yacht in the lake. See the project gallery for more photos. They don't usually sail the model yachts on Thursday's. At weekends they regularly meet on Sunday mornings for model yachting, and on weekdays, they meet on Wednesday mornings, and sometimes Tuesday afternoons. It's the power boat sessions that meets on Tuesday and Thursday mornings.

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Valley Pway Bville (Oct 2018) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

15th August 2021

A Sunday morning walk along Bournville Lane, to see if I could see any activity from the Bournville Model Yacht Club. Luckily, there was a whole bunch of them out at Bournville Lake, with a lot of model yachts, as you can see in the gallery below. The members seem to be mostly retired men and women.

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Valley Parkway Bournville" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Model Yachts Bournville TVP (Aug 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
100 passion points
Elliott Brown Green open spaces
09 Aug 2021 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

A visit to Sandwell Valley Country Park on the 4th August 2021

I've been meaning to do a proper walk around of Sandwell Valley Country Park for a while now. My last visit four years ago for the Big Sleuth, I didn't get far into the park. This time entered via Salters Lane, passed a farm, then a bridge over the M5 led to Swan Pool. Eventually got back on the main path and found the Sandwell Priory ruins before one more bridge over the motorway.

View feature View community

A visit to Sandwell Valley Country Park on the 4th August 2021





I've been meaning to do a proper walk around of Sandwell Valley Country Park for a while now. My last visit four years ago for the Big Sleuth, I didn't get far into the park. This time entered via Salters Lane, passed a farm, then a bridge over the M5 led to Swan Pool. Eventually got back on the main path and found the Sandwell Priory ruins before one more bridge over the motorway.


Previous Sandwell Valley Country Park post from my visit of July 2017.

 

Sandwell Valley Country Park, 4th August 2021

It's been around two years since I last got off the tram at West Bromwich Central Tram Stop. And since then we have had the pandemic. By late July 2021, the Midland Metro Alliance closed the extension from Bull Street to Stephenson Street (so all stops to Library are closed until October 2021 for track relaying works). So I booked my day ticket in the My Metro app before I set out, and travelled to Bull Street Tram Stop.

I got the tram to West Bromwich Central, and after a coffee and toastie at Costa at New Square Shopping Centre, started walking towards Sandwell Valley Country Park (via the Cronehills Interchange Bridge which crosses The Expressway). I avoided Dartmouth Park, and got to Dagger Lane, and headed down Salters Lane to get into the park.

 

Sandwell Park Farm

Welcome to Sandwell Valley Country Park. Home to Sandwell Park Farm. This sign seen from Salters Lane. Sandwell Valley Children's Fun Fair is to the right.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I almost walked up the road to the car park, but instead got back on Salters Lane towards the gate and went through it into the park.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The path / road to walk on was quite rough. On the right saw a field full of cows.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

These flowers growing in the field are Helicrysum arenarium, according to a scan of Google Lens on my phone.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Further down, another field was full of sheep.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The rough path continues on towards the first bridge that crosses over the M5 motorway.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Before I crossed the bridge, saw another path, this one runs around Hillhouse Farm

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

M5 bridge crossing no 1

The first bridge over the M5 motorway. It is a Weak Bridge, so only vehicles of 7.5T mgw or less. Assume it is used by lightweight farm or park vehicles?

dndimg alt="M5 bridge 1" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 1 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The bridge rises over the M5 motorway as I walked towards the other half of the park.

dndimg alt="M5 bridge 1" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 1 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A lot of traffic on the M5 below. Heading towards the end of the M5 and M6, Junction 8. Left lane, M6 south, right lanes, M6 north.

dndimg alt="M5 bridge 1" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 1 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This view below towards M5, Junction 1 for West Bromwich. There was also a sign for Birmingham Park & Ride (either train or tram). If train then it probably means either The Hawthorns or Smethwick Galton Bridge.

dndimg alt="M5 bridge 1" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 1 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Swan Pool

This is the largest lake at Sandwell Valley Country Park. It is called the Swan Pool (alternative names include Wasson or Warstone). Used for sailing. Home of ducks, geese and swans. Paths around the lake for walks, taking your dog for a walk. Also used by cyclists.

A walk around Swan Pool, along the paths in a clockwise direction.

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Some swans in the lake, near decking used for fishing.

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There was Canada geese in the lake as well as some Greylag geese.

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

After leaving Swan Pool, got a couple more photos from the path towards Park Lane, near the Priory Woods Local Nature Reserve.

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Swan Pool Sandwell Valley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Swan Pool SVCP (Aug 2021) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Path from Park Lane

After leaving Swan Pool I was next heading towards Park Lane. I eventually got to this gate and crossed over, but couldn't see any pavements to safely walk to The Hawthorns, so instead followed the path towards the ruins instead.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Looking back to the Park Lane exit, behind me, I was approaching the ruins of both Sandwell Priory (closed 1525) and Sandwell Hall (demolished 1928).

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Valley CP (Aug 2021) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Sandwell Priory Ruins

The remains of Sandwell Priory, a medieval Benedictine monastery, which was excavated between 1982 and 1988. Some of the finds are on display at a small museum at Sandwell Park Farm. It was built in the mid 12th century by William son of Guy de Offeni, Lord of the Manor of West Bromwich. It was located next to the 'Sand Well' a natural spring a short distance to the south from which the Priory gets its name. In the first couple of centuries there was probably hundreds of monks here, but by the second half of the 14th century, there was only about one or two monks at the priory. After a recovery in the 15th century, the numbers declined again by the time Cardinal Wolsey closed it in 1525. By this date there was only the Prior and one monk, and many buildings were in a poor state.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Priory Ruins" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Priory Ruins SVCP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Sandwell Priory Ruins" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Priory Ruins SVCP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Sandwell Priory Ruins" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Priory Ruins SVCP (Aug 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Sandwell Priory Ruins" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Priory Ruins SVCP (Aug 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Sandwell Hall Ruins

Sandwell Hall was built in top of Sandwell Priory in 1705. The site was bought by Lord Dartmouth in 1701, and in 1705 he demolished most of the existing buildings to build a new house. It was built in brick and had towers on three corners. In the 19th century a portico supported by columns was added to the front of the hall, and the hall was extended to the west. The Dartmouth's moved to Patshull near Wolverhampton in 1853, and Sandwell Hall had a variety of uses before it was demolished in 1928.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Hall Ruins" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Hall Ruins SVCP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Sandwell Hall Ruins" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sandwell Hall Ruins SVCP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

M5 bridge crossing no 2

After seeing the ruins of both Sandwell Priory and Sandwell Hall, the path leads directly to another footbridge over the M5 motorway. Again a Weak Bridge for vehicles with 7.5T mgw.

dndimg alt="M5 Bridge 2" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 2 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I wasn't expecting to cross the M5 twice, as I originally thought of leaving the park at Park Lane (but no pavements).

dndimg alt="M5 Bridge 2" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 2 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Busy traffic on the M5 below. Was a 40 mph limit towards the junction with the M6.

dndimg alt="M5 Bridge 2" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 2 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Southbound towards Worcester and Bristol was fine, just northbound to the end of the M5 looked congested.

dndimg alt="M5 Bridge 2" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Bridge 2 M5 SVCP (Aug 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Exit to Europa Avenue

After crossing over the second M5 bridge, I left via the path towards Europa Avenue. Found a housing estate with various cul-de-sacs. The path emerged onto a cul-de-sac called St John's Close. Saw this Welcome sign.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/SVCP Europa Ave (Aug 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Now on Europa Avenue, saw this Sandwell Valley Community Noticeboard next to a red post box.

dndimg alt="Sandwell Valley Country Park" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/SVCP Europa Ave (Aug 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Passing a Mercure Hotel, I took a route towards Kenrick Park Tram Stop, via Beeches Road, Birmingham Road, Roebuck Lane and Devereux Road. Found a path onto the West Bromwich Parkway, and Kenrick Park was a short walk away. The tram back had no free seats, so stood all the way back to Bull Street.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
90 passion points
Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
21 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Roundhouse Birmingham: a timeline to reopening

Finally Roundhouse Birmingham has reopened to the public. Located at Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street, it is on the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline. Originally opened in 1874, to the designs of W. H. Ward as the Corporation Depot. Also used by the London and North Western Railway as a railway depot at the time. Now co-owned by the Canal & River Trust and National Trust.

View feature View community

Roundhouse Birmingham: a timeline to reopening





Finally Roundhouse Birmingham has reopened to the public. Located at Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street, it is on the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline. Originally opened in 1874, to the designs of W. H. Ward as the Corporation Depot. Also used by the London and North Western Railway as a railway depot at the time. Now co-owned by the Canal & River Trust and National Trust.


History of Roundhouse Birmingham

A crescent shaped Grade II* listed building, it was built for the Corporation of Birmingham from 1873 to 1874, to the designs of William Henry Ward (he also designed the Great Western Arcade). The two gatehouses facing the corner of Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street were completed in 1885. It was originally named Corporation Wharf, as it was near the Birmingham Canal. It was also used as a large railway depot for the London and North Western Railway, on the Stour Valley Line.

The site was arranged to create a highly secure internal storage environment, for open air storage, horses and maintenance.

Pevsner describes it having a pair of picturesque Gothic lodges. And that inside was more of a semicircular range with a cartway running under it's centre to the canal. With evocative cobbled pavements.

The building was used by the City of Birmingham Engineers Department until the 1980s, when it became redundant and was sold. It was bought by British Waterways (now the Canal & River Trust) in 2001.

Unused for many years, other than part of it as a nursery school, the Canal & River Trust and the National Trust gained funding in 2017 for the restoration of the building, and to open it up to the public. It should have opened in 2020, but delays due to the pandemic, means it won't open now until at least late summer 2021.

Some of the earliest tours by narrowboat have started in late July 2021, during the summer heatwave.

 

2009

Some of my earliest photos of the Roundhouse, taken from the opposite towpath on the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline, between the Sheepcote Street Bridge and St Vincent Street Bridge.

 

15th May 2009

At the time there was a lot of narrowboats moored up on both sides of the towpath next to the Roundhouse.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (May 2009) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There was still a brick wall alongside the Roundhouse, part of it would be later removed when restoration works began years later.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (May 2009) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2013

A look at the pair of gatehouses from the corner of Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street, and the first look at the inside of the horseshoe courtyard for the first time. A few months later, I saw the Roundhouse close up from the towpath.

 

23rd February 2013

At the time the Roundhouse for for sale or to let, and the junction here was a bit different.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Roundhouse BCN Mainline (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Signs on the gate "Warning Kingdom Security".

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Feb 2013).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This is what the horseshoe courtyard looked like at the time, years before the restoration began.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Roundhouse BCN Mainline (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

18th May 2013

A look through the railings to the back of the Roundhouse. The former Fiddle & Bone pub on the right was derelict at the time, but would be restored and reopen a few years later.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (May 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2015

The Fiddle & Bone pub was restored and reopened, so time to look at the Roundhouse again from the canalside towpath.

 

26th December 2015

It was nice to see the Fiddle & Bone restored. They put out painted picnic benches at the time, and they sealed off the arches in the Roundhouse behind.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2015) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This area was all part of the Fiddle & Bone beer garden, at the back of the Roundhouse.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2015) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2017

A few years later, the Fiddle & Bone was renamed to The Distillery.

 

26th October 2017

By now, the Roundhouse was co-owned by the National Trust and Canal & River Trust, and within a few years would begin work to restore the building. Meanwhile I was having a look at The Distillery from the opposite side of the canal.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Oct 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Two years after seeing The Distillery, the Roundhouse next door would start to get restored.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Oct 2017) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There is an entrance to the pub from the canalside, there was formerly one from the first floor on Sheepcote Street.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Oct 2017) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2019

During the BCN 250 celebrations, I noticed that work to restored the Roundhouse had begun.

 

2nd November 2019

There was a parade of narrowboats up and down the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline at the time for BCN 250, while the Roundhouse was under scaffolding.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Scaffolding up the right hand side of the Roundhouse, they were also replacing the old windows.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Now called Roundhouse Birmingham. The area out front was still a beer garden for The Distillery, but the picnic benches were no longer painted.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

It should have been completed and reopened by 2020, but the pandemic resulted in it being delayed until 2021.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

While at the time this was the beer garden of The Distillery, in future it would (probably) also act as the public entrance to Roundhouse Birmingham.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Nov 2019) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

27th December 2019

One last update before the end of 2019, and before I heard about the coming virus. The pair of lodges were under scaffolding. Road layout had changed on St Vincent Street, near Sheepcote Street.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Part of the Roundhouse already had new windows on one side.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Window view of another window.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Similar window shot as the last one.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This area (below) had a temporary wooden hoarding in place. They would later install a window here. Probably an area for people to view the canal out of the Roundhouse?

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Dec 2019) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

2021

My first major photo update of the Roundhouse since the pandemic began, and in time for it opening to the public to the first time.

 

14th July 2021

Views of the Roundhouse from the Sheepcote Street Bridge. Including the Annatomix rustic horse street art.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The Distillery is on the right. Entrance from the canalside, they make Roundhouse Gin here.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The pair of Victorian lodges fully restored, at the corner of Sheepcote Street and St Vincent Street. Was a homeless man sitting close to the gate, so didn't want to get too close to him.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A zoom in beyond the gate to the horseshoe courtyard area.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rndhse Bham (Jul 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

20th July 2021

Views from the opposite side of the BCN Mainline canal, towards the Roundhouse. I walked past the Victoria narrowboat dropping off visitors, below the Sheepcote Street bridge.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Famed Birmingham street artist Annatomix was commissioned to paint this wall, she has painted a rustic horse.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Onto St Vincent Street, a view towards this gate, all fully restored, with new windows installed.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The horseshoe shaped courtyard, seen inside of the gate from the St Vincent Street corner with Sheepcote Street. Some of the bricks on the cobbled surface have been replaced.

dndimg alt="Roundhouse Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rhouse Bham 20072021 (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
80 passion points
Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
07 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Stratford House: a timber framed survivor dating to 1601

Located in Highgate near Highgate Park is a remarkable survival. Stratford House is close to Highgate Middleway on the no 50 bus route. You can see it from the bus on Moseley Road and New Moseley Road. Built in 1601 for Ambrose Rotton and his wife Bridget, it was once surrounded by farmland. In recent years it's been offices and a swingers club. A fire in 2015, led to restoration 2016.

View feature View community

Stratford House: a timber framed survivor dating to 1601





Located in Highgate near Highgate Park is a remarkable survival. Stratford House is close to Highgate Middleway on the no 50 bus route. You can see it from the bus on Moseley Road and New Moseley Road. Built in 1601 for Ambrose Rotton and his wife Bridget, it was once surrounded by farmland. In recent years it's been offices and a swingers club. A fire in 2015, led to restoration 2016.


On the trail between Digbeth and Kings Heath, if you are getting the no 50 National Express West Midlands Platinum bus (you can catch it from outside Selfridges on Moor Street in the City Centre). Heading past Highgate Park on Moseley Road, you will spot Stratford House. One of the oldest remaining buildings within the City Centre and within the middle ring road, dating to 1601 (last few years of Tudor and Elizabethan England).

 

Stratford House is located at 82 Stratford Place, Highgate, Birmingham B12 0HT. Since 2020 it has been the offices of Age UK Birmingham and Age UK Sandwell.

 

I personally think it could become a museum, run by the Birmingham Museums Trust, or the National Trust. With period furniture. The noise from the passing traffic on Highgate Middleway might causes issues though.

 

The history of Stratford House

The timber framed manor house was built in 1601 for Ambrose Rotton and his wife Bridget. It was originally part of a 20 acre farm that Ambrose owned. He farmed sheep, pigs, oxen and cows on the land.

In 1840, a goods yard was opened nearby at Camp Hill by the Midland Railway. The companies successor, the London, Midland and Scottish Railway, in 1926 bought the house and wanted to demolish it. There was a public outcry and the house was saved.

There was further plans to demolish the house in the 1950s due to it dilapidated state. But it was bought by Ivor Adams in 1954 and it was saved. It has been a Grade II* listed building since 1952.

 

The following two images taken from the Birmingham Museums Trust Collection, Digital Image Resourse and are in the Public Domain and dates to the early 1950s. Under the Creative Commons Zero Licence (CCO).

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1996V79 Stratford House Camp Hill Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Stratford House in 1950. Ink drawing by John L. Baker. Topographical view of Birmingham, from the Birmingham Museums Trust collection.

 

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1976V92 Stratford Place Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Old houses, Stratford Place, Birmingham in 1951. Watercolour. By Allen Edward Everitt. Topographical view of Birmingham, from the Birmingham Museums Trust collection.

 

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the house was home to Network Records, one of the UK's exponents of Techno music.

 

Stratford House, 2010

By the late 2000s and early 2010s it was occupied by Birmingham Centre for Art Therapies (BCAT).

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House 2010.JPG" style="width: 100%;" />Stratford House on Stratford Place in 2010.

 

Stratford House, 2016

In 2014 it was a swingers club called the Tudor Lounge (who signed a 10 year lease with Birmingham City Council). This opened in January 2015, but by December 2015 there was a major fire here. The building was extensively restored during 2016.

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (Apr 2016) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (Apr 2016) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Restoration of Stratford House during April 2016. Views from the no 50 bus.

 

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (May 2016) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (May 2016) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Restoration of Stratford House during May 2016. Seen from the Moseley Road in Highgate.

 

Stratford House, 2018

By 2018, Stratford House was fully restored, and was available to let.

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (April 2018).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford House (Apr 2018).jpg" style="width: 100%;" /> Stratford House fully restored as of April 2018

 

Stratford House, 2021

From 2020, the building is now home to Age UK Birmingham and Age UK Sandwell. In April 2021, Birmingham City Council approved plans for the road in front of Stratford House to be closed to create a Knott Garden. It lies within the Clean Air Zone. If you go onto Highgate Middleway, that is outside of the zone.

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Stratford House" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Stratford Place Highgate (Jun 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />Stratford House at the end of June 2021.

 

Modern 21st Century photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
80 passion points
Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
05 Jul 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Old Crown in Digbeth, dating back to 1368!

The Old Crown in Digbeth claims to date back to 1368. The Grade II* listed building as it is now is more likely to have been built between 1450 and 1500, and could have been established as an inn from the 16th or 17th centuries. It has seen many changes over the centuries. Including road widening in the mid 20th century, and soon the Eastside Metro Extension (by the mid 2020s).

View feature View community

The Old Crown in Digbeth, dating back to 1368!





The Old Crown in Digbeth claims to date back to 1368. The Grade II* listed building as it is now is more likely to have been built between 1450 and 1500, and could have been established as an inn from the 16th or 17th centuries. It has seen many changes over the centuries. Including road widening in the mid 20th century, and soon the Eastside Metro Extension (by the mid 2020s).


One of the oldest buildings in Birmingham, including within what is now the City Centre (as far as the middle ring road), is The Old Crown. They claim to date back to about 1368. For instance they celebrated their 649th birthday in 2017 with a ribbon on one of the doors.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Old Crown Dbeth (Sep 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

So as of 2021 they are now 653 years old!

 

History of The Old Crown

The Old Crown was probably built sometime between the year 1450 and 1500 (in Medieval and early Tudor times). Some evidence dating back to 1492. A man visiting Birmingham in 1538 described the building as a "mansion house made of timber". It is thought that the building was originally built as the Guildhall and School of St. John, Deritend. In 1589 the building was bought by "John Dyckson, alias Bayleys". It remained in the Dixon family for the next 100 years. It may have began to be used as an inn from this time, especially in the years following the Spanish Armada, and gained the name "Crown".

Although later evidence suggests it was used as an inn by around 1626, and being called the Crowne by 1666. During 1643, the forces of Prince Rupert attacking Birmingham during the Civil War (on the way to fire his musket at the cockerel of the old St Martin's Church), there was some skirmishes near the inn.

The house was converted into two houses in 1684, and then into three by 1693. It remained three houses until the 19th century. Joshua Toulmin Smith saved the building in 1851, from demolition by the Corporation of Birmingham (who wanted to improve the street). The Corporation again proposed to knock it down in 1856 and 1862, but Smith saved it each time.

 

The following three Public Domain Dedication images taken from the Birmingham Museums Trust Collection.

An etching of the Old Crown Inn, Deritend, Birmingham, 1895-1900, by Samuel Henry Baker (d. 1909).

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1970V130 Old Crown Inn Deritend.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A watercolour painting by George Warren Blackham of the Old Crown Inn Deritend, Birmingham. Probably in the late 19th century.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1956V372 Old Crown Inn Deritend Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

An etching of the Old Crown Inn, Deritend, Birmingham by J. Alfred Swatkins. Possibly late 19th or early 20th century, with the old tram tracks.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1965V8 Old Crown Inn Deritend Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

High Street Deritend, outside of The Old Crown was widened and reopened by 1955. This included removing the old tram tracks, and the old cobbled road surface. Buildings opposite were demolished, and the Bull Ring Trading Estate was later built there (on the site of St. John's Church, Deritend, which was demolished in 1947, after suffering damage during the Second World War in 1940).

 

Two vintage photos taken by the late Phyllis Nicklin, who was a tutor in Geography in the former Department of Extramural Studies, University of Birmingham. They were originally digitised by BrumPic.

The Old Crown in Digbeth taken by Phyllis Nicklin (University of Birmingham). This was probably before the road was widened in the mid 1950s.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Old Crown P Nicklin 2.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The Old Crown in Digbeth, taken in 1960 by Phyllis Nicklin (University of Birmingham). High Street Deritend had been widened in the 1950s.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown P Nicklin.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />


The Old Crown was bought by the Brennan family in 1991. In the summer of 1994, they found an old well, while doing repairs, when they were clearing out the old sheds at the rear of the property, which at the time had been closed off for more than 100 years. The Brennan family reopened the pub in 1998.

The pub is a Grade II* listed building (since 1952) at 186, 187 and 188 High Street Deritend, and is on the corner of Heath Mill Lane. It is situated to the right of the Custard Factory.

As of the summer of 2021, roadworks are taking place down on the Digbeth High Street. This is to build the Eastside Metro Extension. Which will be starting properly from July 2021. The route will go past the HS2 Curzon Street Station. Work has also began to built a Sprint bus route towards Solihull and Coventry on the A45 (via the Small Heath Highway and Coventry Road). It could be ready in time for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games.

 

The Old Crown in the 21st Century

The following images of The Old Crown were taken during October 2009 by Elliott Brown. This was on the first day that I would take photos around the Digbeth area.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The Old Crown 1368.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (10).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (12).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (14).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The Beer Garden / car park at the back from Heath Mill Lane.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Oct 2009) (16).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Old Crown Coffee Club, seen from High Street Deritend during January 2014.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Jan 2014).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Irish flags and bunting up, at The Old Crown, during March 2014 for the St Patrick's Day Festival. The parade used to take place down the Digbeth High Street each March until 2019.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Mar 2014) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A red ribbon on The Old Crown during November 2016, getting ready for Christmas. This view taken from the bus.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Nov 2016).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Old Crown during March 2017 for St Patrick's Day. Getting ready for The Father Ted's Lampa. The St Patrick's Fundraiser.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Digbeth 110318.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Seen in March 2018, with snow on the roof, was The Old Crown. Again getting ready for St Patrick's Day. The beer garden around the back, became the Guinness Village, to show the England vs Ireland Six Nations Rugby Union match on the TV. 

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Mar 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

One year on, to March 2019. St Patrick's Day again at The Old Crown. This time it had signs on it for 13 Hop House Lager.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Mar 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Passing The Old Crown in Digbeth on the no 4 bus during the middle of June 2021. This was during the Euro 2020 match between England and Croatia.

dndimg alt="The Old Crown Digbeth" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Crown Dbeth (Jun 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Modern 21st Century photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

Share  Spend Points  Connect with us
80 passion points
Show more